Wolves Unveil New Ticket Plans for 2009-2010 season

In response to the current economic conditions facing all Minnesotans, Minnesota Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor today introduced the team’s new 2009-10 season ticket campaign that includes a sweeping range of programs that address fans’ needs. One of the centerpieces of the campaign is the new “No-Risk Pledge,” which eliminates the risk of the uncertain economy for Wolves season ticket holders by guaranteeing a refund of their unused tickets should they lose their jobs in 2009.
Along with the “No-Risk Pledge,” the Timberwolves announced a rollback of ticket prices for next season – 95% of season tickets lowering in price (through July 1) and the remaining 5% staying flat – through the team’s new ticket sales campaign dubbed “One Team.” Also, the Timberwolves have introduced a new nine-month, no interest, no additional fees payment plan for season ticket purchases.
Prime courtside seats will remain the same, but most other season tickets will decrease from between $4 to $15 each per game…

Asked how the Wolves can afford to do so, team president Chris Wright called the new pricing a “volume play” design to boost the season-ticket base, at about 5,000 this season, and create a “home-court advantage” by filling empty seats with paying customers.

They’re lowering prices on 95 percent of season tickets in Target Center. The team says the price drop is 44 percent in the upper tier and more than 11 percent in the lower tier.
The Wolves new marketing plan comes in the thick of a struggling economy and a dwindling fan base.
“The economy right now is uncertain and we’ve listened to our fans’ concerns and responded by providing reduced ticket pricing, new payment plan options and protection against job loss — all of which are important to Minnesotans right now,” Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor said. “I don’t want these uncertain times to deter our fans from coming out to Target Center and enjoying NBA basketball.”
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